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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)
and welcome. five months after the uprising after colonel gaddafi's roll, britain has recognized the rebel council as the new government of libya. the u.s., france, and more than 30 other countries have recognized the council. our world affairs editor has this assessment. >> the libyan embassy in central london. a hugely valuable piece of real estate. the siege as usual by a small, ever present group of demonstrators. they were overjoyed by britain's decision to recognize them. this is tripoli where the heart of the city was the green square is decorated with a gigantic portrait of colonel gaddafi himself. he has never been a man to shrink from self publicity. britain, which was keenest about bombing libya has decided to cut the last remaining diplomatic links. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new diplomat to take over the embassy in london. >> britain has joined 29 other countries in recognizing the national transitional council. france did so at the start. germany, turkey, and
for this to end. >> this is newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. >> i am in london libya has condemned britain's decision to expel all of colonel khadafy's lipitor -- diplomats after recognizing the transitional council as the libyan government. >> norway has launched an independent inquiry into friday said the attacks. >> let's get more on that story now. thomas edgar was one of the first journalist on the scene after last friday's mass killing on the island. he says police reacted relatively quickly, despite criticism of their response time. >> there seems to be a lot of tension, especially among the journalists. in my opinion, they had two options. one was to wait for the helicopters being scrambled from one of the army bases, which was outside of oslo, then to get a pickup point, load their gear, flight to the island, etc. or they could go directly to the island, which is approximately 35 kilometers outside oslo. what police have been repeatedly saying house -- the last couple of days is that they made the right decision. they just jump in the car and made their way to the island and were
." >> this is bbc world news america. i m.j. and o'brien. britain recognizes the main opposition group as the governing authority, but will it break the stalemate? still on alert in norway, the suffering from last week's attacks continue to grip the country as the government promises an investigation. and counting down to the olympics, with just one year to go. london is busy getting ready. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of nato bombing and continuing combat on the ground, the international effort to remove moammar gaddafi from power got another boost today. britain declared but another governing authority and expel the remaining diplomats from london. this follows the move by the u.s. and paves the way to unfreezing millions in dollars. but will it make a difference on the ground? john simpson reports. >> 6:00 in the morning in the mountains. spies have warned of a buildup of pro gaddafi forces nearby, but these are not trained soldiers. they are just a bunch of volunteers. hours pass, and the gaddafi troops do not attack. the rebels w
on the ground? we have this report. >> the government now is a significant boost for them. britain is following the u.s. and france in intensify the pressure on the libyan regime. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government, and we are inviting the transitional council to appoint a new diplomatic convoy to take over the embassy in london. >> the libyan embassy in london is in nights bridge. the ambassador here was expelled in may. now, they have three days to leave. the other diplomats must go, as well. and they must deal with the frozen assets, now controlled by opponents of the regime. this is an important symbolic moment, especially for the small group of rebel supporters, who come here but to replace the flag of the gaddafi regime with their alone. the question is, what difference will it make on the ground? joining the demonstrators today, a former financial adviser at the embassy. >> this is very positive. it is a psychological boost, and the council will be able to use those funds to help the libyan people, and hopefully, this is just the beginning. >>
applications for similar cases against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the pape
, "bbc world news." >> britain's new phone headache hacking news spreads. it prompts a rare debate in british parliament. >> and concerns portugal may need another bailout after its debt rating is reduced to junk status. >> and will it beya has produced a western arc to protect the city of misratah. welcome to "bbc world news." i'm david eades. also coming up, the news of family in. how could this latest tragedy have been prevented? >> and the focus of the berlin fashion week. >> the phone hacking scandal right at the heart of the media group news international continues to deepen as the british parliament prepares to hold an emergency debate on the issue. police now told the relatives some of the victims of the 1995 bombing that some of the victims' cell phones may have been hacked by the news of the world. >> tomorrow is the sixth anniversary of the london bombing. today some of the enter reaved are enduring fresh anguish, what is described as details discovered as part of the latest investigation into phone hacking. >> these parents lost their son david in the bombing. he is not
against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shoc
about that. >> any other information on what his relationship with britain is? >> i do not know. it is too early in the case. i do not alloknow. >> is it true he went to liberia? can you confirm that? >> i do not know. >> how about the ways he communicated with the cells. >> i cannot comment because i don't know. it is difficult for me to answer. >> there was a fear he might send signals to those cells. that was a fear. >> did he want to read the manifesto at the initial hearing? >> yes, he wanted to read it and he read some of it for the judge. >> how much? >> maybe five minutes or something like that. >> [inaudible] at what point exactly? >> after the bombing, after the action in the island, and he also thought he would be killed at the trial. he believes someone would kill him. >> the other cells [inaudible] >> that is correct. >> [inaudible] has he said anything about that? >> he knows he is not permitted to say anything. >> [inaudible] >> it is complicated for me to answer. >> he actually surrendered to police -- can you explain why he did that? >> he was surrounded by the
"atlantis," the final launch of the nasa shuttle program. >> brown: britain's "news of the world" scandal expands, and ray suarez explores its impact on both journalism and politics. >> lehrer: tom bearden has the latest on the exxon pipeline rupture that gushed thousands of gallons of crude oil into a montana river. >> it's been a week since the silver tip pipeline released oil into the yellowstone river. but it may be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william a
, there are questions about the cozy relationship between the police come and media, and politicians in britain. >> i am the first prime minister to publish meetings between senior executives, private tears -- proprietors. this stretches right back to the general election. >> it was his decision to fire the former "news of the world," editor andy coulson that is drawing the most criticism. there are questions about whether andy coulson knew about the illegal activity on his watch. >> he was caught in a tragic conflict of loyalty between the standards and integrity that people should expect of him and his staff and his personal allegiance to andy coulson. he made the wrong choice. >> you don't make decisions in hindsight, you make them in the present. you live and you learn and to believe you me, i have learned. >> the labor leader pointed out that downing street had been warned over andy coulson's past. the opposition also alleges that cameron has met 26 times with representatives from murdoch's companies since taking office. >> let's get the continuing impact of this whole scandal on rupert murdoch's e
. international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million accounts. the united states early have five. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring alarm bells. >> they have been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead, and we expect others to contribute. there are signs others are beginning to put things away, because we need that to happen rapidly. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken control in areas controlled or influenced militant islamists. now they say a ban has been lifted, but politics are complicated and aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. so the familiar images of hunger and the predictable scramble for money and resources. >> for more on efforts to assist those suffering from drought, i am joined by the deputy assistant secretary for refugees and migration. you have just returned from the refugee camps of eastern africa. tell us what you saw. >> i have been too many refugee camps across the world. i can tell you is among the worst i have ever seen. the rate coming into the camps is very high. it is 1300 a day into
. thank you, ashley. >>> just ahead on "the morning news" a cell phone hacking scandal grows in britain. >>> plus this looks something from "the mummy" but it's not the sahara, but it's actually arizona. >>> first scott pelley has a preview of tonight's "cbs evening news." >>> they helped win the race to space but now they're losing their jobs. the end of a career for nasa workers from astronauts to mechanics. where do they go from here? find out tonight on the "cbs evening news." >>> "cbs moneywatch" sponsored by vagisil, introducing vagisil wash with odor block, the confident clean. l, introducing vagisil wash with odor block, the confident clean. as i get older, i'm making changes to support my metabolism. i'm more active, i eat right, and i switched to one a day women's active metabolism, a complete women's multivitamin, plus more -- for metabolism support. and that's a change i feel good about. [ female announcer ] from one a day. [ dramatic soundtrack plays ] whoa! man: what is that? i don't know, but it burns! it's like fire. woman: ow, ow! i can't see. man: it's singeing me! it'
-term agreement. >> ifill: now, britain's prime minister takes on his critics in the phone hacking scandal. david cameron faced questions today about hiring a former tabloid editor who's since resigned and been arrested and about rupert murdoch's aborted bid for b-sky-b-- british sky broadcasting. we start with a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: rupert murdoch flew the prime minister postponed parliament's summer break by a day to try to re-establish his own standing with a statement and debate. after two weeks of resisting pressure for a full-scale apology for hiring andy coulson david cameron edged towards one and he said people would hear the full genuine article if andy coulson was found to have lied. >> i have an old fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. but if it turns out i've been lied to that would be a moment for a profound apology. and in that event i can tell you i will not fall short. people will of course make judgements about it. of course i regret and i am extremely sorry about the furore it has caused with 20/20 hindsight and all
a damning report from the way britain's biggest police force has dealt with the phone hacking scandal. they are accused of a catalog of failures and a scathing report of some senior offers. >> i can't say more than that. >> that's john yates describing his choice not to reopen the inquiry when he gave evidence to m.p.'s last week. in the report, they agree with him. >> i'm not letting you get away with that. absolutely not. >> and even more critical. his conduct is described as unprofessional and inappropriate. but the report also criticizes news international. accusing the company of deliberately thwarting the various investigations. yesterday rupert murdoch denied he was responsible. >> no. >> you're not responsible? >> [inaudible] >> the moment when a member of the public threw a fope pie at him has generated many of the headlines. it was scrutinized on both sides of the atlantic. >> but now at least u.s. investors appear to have been reassured. and the share price rallied rising by more than 5%. but the threat of a criminal investigation still hangs over the company. today's home
become britain's answer to watergate. but this time, the bad guys are the newspaper men and women. hacking the phones not just of princes of the realm but also a 13-year-old murder victim, just to get a scoop. they allegedly did it with the help of corrupt police officers on the company payroll. already britain's top two policemen have resigned. now, the prime minister is in the cross hairs. david cameron is on the hot seat tomorrow. but today the focus was on the patriarch and his younger son, james. >> james and i would like to say how sorry we are for what has happened. >> reporter: both expressed regret. >> invading people's privacy by listening to their voicemail is wrong. paying police officece for information is wrong. >> it's a matter of great regret of mine, my father's and everyone at news corp. ration. >> reporter: they blamed n ns executives and reporters lower down the corp rate food chain. >> the people that i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> reporter: among murdoch's most trusted employees, his own children, who ran multimillion dollar ch
economy is stable at this time because the government has taken difficult decisions to get to britain's defeat. to -- to britain's debt. and they announced they have no plans to abandoned that plan. >> to norway, and the justice minister praising the fantastic work done by police after the bombing and shooting on utoeya island. but there has been criticism to have time it took police to get to the island. it's emerged that police also overestimated the number of people who died on the island and revised the death toll from 86 to 68. eight people were also killed in the bomb attack and a number of people are still missing from the island. >> the most important thing is we are completely focused on supporting the families of those and all those affected. we have things in mace all over the country and have people in our government affected. we have missing people at utoeya. and we have many people deeply affected. we have to look after them. i'm completely open to discuss how the response to these attacks have been handled. but i would like to emphasize that the police have done a magni
of the world," britain's top-selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch's global media empire, has been afflicted by claims of phone hacking. david cameron expressed his shock that the phone of a girl who was murdered years ago was hacked into by a "news of the world" correspondent. >> the scandal has been growing and growing as more and more people learned that their phones had been hacked. now, a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old 2 went missing -- 13-year-old milly dowler went missing. there were allegations that "news of the world" packed into her phone and that some messages might have been deleted in that act. >> if these allegations are true, this is a dreadful act, a dreadful situation. what i have read in the papers is quite shocking -- that someone could do this -- while knowing that the police were trying to find this person and find out what had happened. >> there is more pressure on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she h
is very powerful as well and back there and britain, politicians are simply too scared to confront the murdoch empire? >> a british company could not go and buy anything more than 20%, he has 30% of british sky. it is been argued that he has far too much power and they assume that his papers decide whether they will become the prime minister or the next government. that is totally unacceptable. >> it was your former boss who was one of the first to cozy up to rupert murdoch. >> if you ask him, and you can ask gordon brown. they used to be played up funny enough by rebecca brooks. they have far too much influence and they have produced this kind of scandal and it must top. >> are you confident that this will stop now that the public is so outraged by who else has been hacked? >> the public is rightfully outraged by this. there is a failure by the commission. the police have been cozying up. you can be assured that parliament would like a piece of this and across the party lines. we have to do something about the media moguls like mr. murdoch who are saying that everything will be ad
. is this a watershed moment for britain's political culture? >> you can downplay it and denied that the problem is a deep, or accept the seriousness of the situation and deal with it. i want to deal with it. these inquiries, i believe, give chance for a fresh start and i want to take it. >> welcome to gmt. so in the program -- south sudan on the brink of nationhood. good will, but will it last? an appeal for emergency funds for the horn of africa. hundreds of thousands abandon their homes. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and 9:00 p.m. in sydney. prime minister david cameron has announced two investigations into what he calls the disgusting phone hacking scandal, which has sent shockwaves through the country's political culture. pledged to get to the truth of what happened to, but also to clean up the culture. within minutes, police confirmed the rest of the former editor of the "news of the world" who was hired by mr. cameron to be his communications chief. >> one former "news of the world" employee and calls for her resignation. today, it's another. he went on to be director o
that the telephone of a murder teenage girl was hacked. britain has confirmed that it will withdraw more troops from afghanistan next year. the british prime minister david cameron defended the decision that troops will no longer be involved in a combat role by 2014. his country is committed to a longstanding relationship with afghanistan. >> we will withdraw troops this year and next year. we will be sending combat operations by the end of 2014. we will not have troops in the numbers that we have now. but we will have a long-term relationship. we will have a relationship that will consist of a very large a program as we help you to build the future. a relationship based on trade and diplomacy and military training. the president and i did they have discussed our plan to build a model academy for training. the afghan army officers of the future that will form the backbone of your already successful army. that would involve 100 british troops and funding from other nations. $38 million from the americans will go into the initiative. our relationship will involve close and frank political contact betw
robinson reports. >> end to britain's most powerful, most feared media going you will. the policemen are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take that -- them into questioning. that fell into a crew of m.p.'s. his wife was behind him. offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously at his side throughout. >> i would like to say how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> rupert murdoch was determined to deliver one key line. >> i would just like to say one sentence -- this is the most humbling day of my life. thank you. >> they were sorry, they were humble but whose fault was the criminality in their company? >> do you accept that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who is responsible? >> the people they trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> who that was he wasn't say. >> this is not an excuse. maybe it's an explanation. news world is less than 1 -- news corp is less than 1% of our company. i employ 53,000 people around the world. >> at this point his wife patrolleded him to stop banging t
of them including france and britain, do have sympathy for the palestinian position. however, they do not want an american veto. they are afraid it could become violent in the occupied territories and that could, perhaps, get entangled in the protest of the wider arab world. that has not happened yet. so far, the air of spring has been very focused on internal issues. -- the era of the spring has been very focused on internal issues. america's standing in the region could take a hard hit, and the western states, too. the europeans are looking for a compromise, trying to convince the destiny is to drop their bid for membership, but to give them enough to get back to the peace process. whether or not they succeed, there is a sense that the arab- israeli conflict is becoming a major issue at the u.n. again and it will dominate in the coming months. >> britain has joined france in suggesting colonel gadhafi could remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. the british foreign secretary has been holding talks with his french counterpart. he said it was up to the libya -- libyan pe
for an extra 185 million pounds immediately. the international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million pounds to somalia this year. united states has given barely half of that. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring the alarm bells. >> contributions from other countries has been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead. we expect others to contribute. there are signs others are beginning. we need that to happen rapidly and vigorously. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken hold in areas controlled or influenced by militant islamist group. they made it too dangerous for foreign aid groups to operate directly. they say a ban has been lifted, but the politics are competen-- complicated and aid is not getting to the right people fast enough. the familiar images of hunger and helplessness. the predictable scramble for money and access as famine bites into somalia. erson isast one p reported to have been killed in malawi in demonstrations against the government. despite an earlier court ruling banning protests, protests have continued. th
. the u.n. chief, the u.s. come up in the u.k. have all condemned the violence. britain which was what the biggest aid donor last week -- which was the biggest aid donors suspended their payments. this makes an end to the protests of the more difficult in all of the world's poorest countries. -- in one of the world's poorest countries. >> this is "newsday," on the bbc. >> the headlines this hour. european leaders have agreed to a second loan for greece with banks and private investors contributing more than $150 billion. >> james murdoch has rejected claims that he gave mistaken evidence to british members of parliament. the claims for made by former senior executives of the "news of the world," newspaper. who owns the south china seas? this is a simple enough question but the answer is complicated. a number of countries claim ownership. hillary clinton has arrived in bali where the asean group of nations has been discussing the contentious issue of maritime boundaries. it is believed that the south china sea is rich in oil and gas. countries in the region are competing with each other
and britain decide that this is really shameful. we don't have any institutions to build defenses. we don't have any institutions to plan and run an operation. never again. so they met on the island. they came off with an agreement. when the european union was set up there always was a security pillar. it had been put aside so that they could focus on trees that affected finance and capital market and movement of people and bringing the continent closer together. but they decided to fire up the security pillar. they set up -- nato is run, by the way, by a board of directors , the north atlantic council. military committee, and then you have various other committees, but those are the key structures that run nato. and so the europeans set up a military committee, military staff. they set up a satellite center in brussels. all the sudden focus woke up in washington and said, hey, what are these europeans doing? of the going to take away what nato is doing? there are to be duplication? the u.s. with a uk set up some ground rules. no, this is all okay, but you can set up a permanent headquart
levels of power in britain. the people of this country shocked to learn for the last 30 years murdoch and his executives have been dictating policy to the politicians and the police. the murdoches certainly have the ear of britain's prime minister. in 15 months, cameron has had 26 meetinin with murdoch executives. how powerful was rupert murdoch here in britain? >> immensely p perful. the view of every prime minister for the last 30 years is that no one can get elected without the blessing of the patriarch. >> reporter: the now not clear that either murdoch can survive this crisis. news corporation shares have tumbled. if the company faces criminal charges it could be forced to unload some of its most lucative holdings in the u.s. including fox tv. this really is a dynasty on the brink. jeffrey kofmananabc news, london. >>> and coming up, the retirement revolution. one american city drawing boomers faster than any other. mine was earned over the south pacific in 1943. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 141 (some duplicates have been removed)

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